COMMUNITY

8-month-old baby British Cypriot Saylor needs your help.

This is an urgent appeal to save Saylor an 8-month-old baby girl, with a Greek Cypriot grandfather. Saylor has been diagnosed with a very rare type of leukaemia called JMMl affecting only 1 in a million children. Her only hope is a stem cell transplant, we are desperately appealing to people aged 17 to 55 from the Greek Cypriot community and beyond to become a donor.

All it takes is a cheek swab which is simple and painless. Please register on-line today and order your swab kit at dkms.org.uk, you could be the match to save Saylor.

Every 20 minutes, someone in the UK is diagnosed with blood cancer – those that affect the body’s bone marrow, blood or lymphatic system – such as leukaemia, myelome or lymphona. Yet, just 2% of the UK population is registered as potential blood stem cell donors. People from Cypriot, Greek and mixed ethnicity backgrounds are under-represented as donors.

Diversifying the register is extremely important to people from our community.

dkms.org.uk or scan the QR Code to register today.


Article written by London Greek Radio

Cypriot play “This Night Honey” coming to the UK, part of the proceeds will be donated to the charity Alkionides UK. 

The theatre group of the popular actor and director Lori Loizidis is travelling to London for the first time to present the successful theatrical comedy “This Night Honey” on Saturday 11th May 2024 at 7.30pm at Millfield Theatre, in Edmonton North London. Birmingham, Sunday 12th May at 7.30pm at University of Birmingham.

Entry: 16+ years-old

A couple decides to break the routine of their long-term relationship by taking an escape to a luxury resort in Pegeia, Paphos. The luxurious suite of the hotel and the incredible view against the background of the endless blue seem like the ideal setting for the rekindling of passion in their love life. 

Will their venture have a successful outcome? Or will their love affair end ignominiously? An important role in the achievement of the goal will be played by the theatre audience as the spectators during the play will be invited to take part in a group “psychotherapy” giving advice to the couple and partly determining the outcome of the play. 

The elements of the play compose a unique mosaic of incredible laughter, love, romance, and authentic love. Through the script, the viewer will have the opportunity to travel musically to nostalgic times. Back when everything was more innocent, more direct, and simpler. 

Actors : Loris Loizidis, Michalis Sofokleous, Maria Mastridou, Maria Papakosta, Stella Filippidou, Irini Salata and Konstantinos Tsitsios star in the show.  

11/05/2024 at 7pm, at Millfield Theatre, at Edmonton, North London to spend two hours of incredible laughter and at the same time travel back in time, to beautiful and nostalgic times.  

12/05/2024 at 7.30pm, Birmingham, University of Birmingham Edgbaston B15 2TT.

It is worth noting that part of the proceeds will be allocated to support the charity Alkionides UK. 

Text – direction Loris Loizidis

The show is suitable for people over 16 years old. 

Tickets are priced at £35 & £30 pounds from Millfield Theatre. Start time of the show: 7:30pm 

https://www.millfieldtheatre.co.uk/whats-on/this-night-honey/

For more information 07831 412 542

MEDIA SPONSORS: LGR & HELLENIC TV


Article written by London Greek Radio

Update: It is with great regret that due to unforeseen circumstances, the LGR Dinner & Dance this Sunday 10th December has been cancelled. 

Please note that those who have purchased tickets to contact LGR on 0208 349 6950 for a full refund.

Sorry for any inconvenience caused in this matter.

————————————————————————

LGR are excited to announce that Greek singer Ageliki Darra will be performing live at the Cypriot Community Centre on Sunday 10th December 2023.

Join us for our dinner & dance featuring a live performance by special guest star Ageliki Darra and her musicians. Including singer Giorgos Yerasimos and musicians Panicos Stylianou, Spyros Katsaros and Gabriel Grigore.

Events like this offer the chance for our station to come together with the community and enjoy a fabulous evening. Moreover, through these events, we can renew and build a good relationship with both our listeners and the companies which work alongside us.

In 2023, our time has also been spent putting together events, such as this one, where all members of our community could come and celebrate our culture together.

Join us to celebrate our 34th Birthday broadcasting to you since 1989. 

It’s a night not to be missed!

Address: The Cypriot Community Centre, Earlham Grove, London N22 5HJ.

Doors open at 6pm, dinner will be served at 7pm.

Delicious 3 course meal with tea and coffee and live entertainment.

Tickets at £40-£45. For more information & tickets please call LGR on 0208 349 6950!

Tickets are expected to sell fast, so to avoid disappointment, we advise that you secure your place now.

We look forward to seeing you all there.

LGR 103.3 FM Dinner & Dance event


Article written by London Greek Radio

The UK’s first and only 24-hour commercial Greek radio station to hold a FM license in London is celebrating 34 years of success this month, weeks after its unofficial 40th anniversary.

London Greek Radio exists to enlighten, amuse and improve the lives of our community both in the UK and abroad. In preserving our Greek and Cypriot heritage and bringing together London’s vibrant Greek community, the LGR brand is thriving by celebrating its Greek and Cypriot roots.

On 8th October 1983, LGR began transmitting to the Greek and Cypriot community as a pirate radio station and officially joined the FM airwaves on 13th November 1989. Based in North Finchley the station began its official broadcasting in November 1989. However, LGR’s origins stretch back to the early 1980s, when Akis Eracleous and Chris Harmanda launched the pirate station. It was the first-ever British station to target an ethnic minority group with its pioneering service to the Greek and Cypriot communities.

Chris Harmanda entered broadcasting to give the London Cypriot community a voice, which he and Mr Eracleous indisputably achieved.

Akis, who DJ’d under the name ‘George Power’, later became a co-founder of Kiss FM. Before this however, he and Mr Harmanda decided to launch LGR in 1983, broadcasting from Finsbury Park to North London with a Greek music format. Programmes initially came from the studio above the Quality Fish Bar in Finsbury Park, owned by the Harmanda family, and the offices in Akis’ house in N4 Grenville Road. Eventually the station spread its wings across the city, with help from friend and engineer Pyers Easton. They moved transmissions to above a Cypriot delicatessen in Muswell Hill, where LGR’s tall aerial mast took it’s programmes to the whole of the North London area. Even in the early days of its arrival on the airwaves, LGR gathered a dedicated following very quickly.

In 2018 we tragically lost both Akis and Chris, but they left with us their incredible legacies. The perseverance and bravery of these men, who scaled the rooftops of sites, ensuring each morning we all awoke to the sound of LGR, can never be forgotten. At the Haringey office, there was an iconic image that proudly hung of its founders and DJ ‘Kokis’ putting up the FM aerial for the pirate station on a rooftop.

The staff and volunteers endured great adversity and went to great lengths during the 1980’s to keep London Greek Radio on the air.

“Growing up in North London in the 90s, the whole family was listening”. Ask a Greek or Cypriot and this is what they will tell you. LGR’s real timeless traits, which helped trigger a sense of nostalgia and a connection to their culture. This is where LGR plays to its strengths and is the reason why London-born Greeks and Cypriots come back to it. This is the modern legacy of London Greek Radio.

LGR presenter Tony Neophytou mentions that “the Greek speaking community have a penchant for radio because of the strength of their attachment to back home. Whether they come from Cyprus, Greece or the Diaspora, anything that recreates a sense of their roots stirs them emotionally. That’s partly due to the music of course, with its lyric content, but it’s also about the culturally relevant topics we talk about.”

For Mr Neophytou, “family and community” is what comes to mind when thinking about LGR. For many London Greeks and Cypriots, the station has provided “a safe space” to go to, affirming roots and heritage and comforting its listeners 24/7. It’s a ‘safe and secure space’ of a trusted-family member, he describes.

In the mid-1980s, tens of thousands of people signed a petition demonstrating the need for LGR to have a real presence within the community. The signatures were handed to the relevant authorities which subsequently contributed to the station being licensed by the radio authorities.

A number of fundraisers with community artists and DJs, i.e. at the Camden Electric Ballroom had thousands come out in support of the beleaguered illegal pirate station. It took a great deal of documentary evidence, correspondence, press campaigns, and petitions to eventually convince the radio authorities that LGR should be granted a licence.

The pirate LGR left the air at the end of 1988 having decided to apply for one of the new incremental radio licenses. They decided to work together with Afro-Carribean station WNK to share a frequency, winning the North London license with a 12-hour daily allowance.

LGR returned to the air legally as London’s first Greek community radio station in November 1989.

The book, ‘London’s Pirate Pioneers‘ (2015) by Stephen Hebditch tells the story of the capital’s pirate radio stations and the people who helped change the British broadcasting system. He writes about LGR’s undeniable legacy in the eighties and the intense pressures it faced to shut down.

However, London Greek Radio became one of Britain’s first-ever licensed ethnic radio stations upon being awarded its license.

On November 13th 1989, LGR opened its doors as a fully legal station, with offices and a studio located on Vale Road, Haringey. In 2003, LGR purchased a freehold in Finchley and moved to its current studios at the LGR House.

One of London’s first-ever licensed ethnic radio stations began official broadcasting on 13th November 1989 upon being awarded its license, breaking ground in changing the landscape of UK radio.

John Kyriakides, Chairman of London Greek Radio, described the twists and turns in the station’s turbulent history.

“It was a difficult and protracted journey. George Eracleous and Chris Harmanda, two young men who intended to launch a Greek-language pirate radio station in the early 1980s, are credited with founding the station. Eventually, the station became a target for the authorities, who prosecuted the founders and repeatedly threatened to arrest them. Though we had to share the frequency with an Afro-Caribbean channel, Eracleous and Harmanda never gave up, and with the help of the Greek and Cypriot communities, a few directors, and myself, the radio station was given a licence at the end of the decade.

“We were only permitted to broadcast for twelve hours at first, however after five years, the Afro-Caribbean station disbanded, and London Greek Radio was then granted a 24-hour radio licence and became an independent radio station.”

Over the years, LGR 103.3 FM has become steadfast to a wide range of listeners; from maturing-settlers-to-the-UK to the coming-of-age London Greek-speakers – connecting listeners to their roots through a carefully balanced programming of music, speech, entertainment and news.

The LGR DJs who went on-air during the Covid pandemic, felt the responsibility to be not only informative but be a form of escapism. Its enduring qualities during the tough times is a testament to the powerful connection it holds within the community.

It also serves advertising for many Greek and Cypriot run businesses in and around North London. LGR has recently increased its English language airtime encouraging more Greek-speaking young people to listen in, particularly during the daytime, drive time and evenings as part of the schedule. LGR is also recruiting younger presenters, who combine Greek music with discussions on everything from cultural identities to chart trends.

The station is an integrated part of the communities’ social lives, including the organised Greekology events. Mr Eracleous suggested launching LGR nights at a local club, which helped to boost the credibility and impact of the station. In 2012, its debut at the Marquee Club with most notably, Cypriot Eurovision star Ivi Adamou, was sold-out with over 500 people in attendance. LGR Club Nights are currently the station’s biggest event, with more than a few dates in London taking place each year.

Today it is the go-to station for the championing of up-and-coming Greek/Cypriot music talents and recently launched its own LGR Productions. It has provided a platform for young music talents, while welcoming big-name guests such as Konstantinos Argiros, Stan, Nikos Vertis, Helena Paparizou, Giannis Ploutarhos and Michalis Hatzigiannis. The attendance of music stars in recent years sprinkled some stardust at the LGR studios.

LGR has supported charities including Radiomarathon, London Autism Group Charity, UK Thalassaemia Society and Alkionides UK Charity. The Leukaemia Cancer Society even gives the credit to LGR in inspiring the creation of the cancer charity. The charity’s website acknowledges this fact.

In 1994 London Greek Radio (LGR) put out a mother’s appeal for her son. Flushed with success the group decided to carry on recruiting new donors, raising awareness of blood cancers, and supporting patients with the disease. Within a year of hearing the appeal on London Greek Radio, the group had formed a committee and registered the charity.”

The station gives a voice to charity fundraising initiatives with its scheduling of specialist shows. LGR recently organised National Thalassaemia Day in partnership with #UKTS and its patrons, raising awareness of an issue which affects many Cypriots today.

LGR is a commercial station and survives on the income generated from its loyal and valued customers and whilst this is the case, it offers a free service to local charity and community interests.

The LGR brand is alive and thriving to this very day. In addition to serving the Greek and Cypriot communities on air, LGR has broken into 21st-century broadcasting by joining the Digital Radio platform.

LGR can now be heard in two major cities on DAB+ (digital radio), namely London and Birmingham.

Furthermore, listeners extend worldwide at lgr.co.uk and the station has a free app for mobile devices which listeners can download from the App or Play stores embracing the ‘on-the-move’  audience.

The audience base of LGR, which includes listeners from the Italian, Spanish, Arab, Jewish, Armenian, Bulgarian, and Turkish Cypriot communities, is well-established and diverse.

LGR’s Managing Director, Tony Jay, said, “More listeners are discovering the ever-growing London Greek Radio family every day, not only Greek-speaking listeners but English, Jewish, Albanian, Arab, Bulgarian, Turkish, Russian and many more that frequently tune in.

He added, “LGR is undergoing a revamp with fresh ideas to attract an even wider audience. Exciting times ahead ‘onwards and upwards’.”

LGR’s Chairman John Kyriakides, added, “With LGR’s edgier playlists of the biggest Greek and Cypriot tunes, Modern Laika, Greek Pop, Entehna, Golden-Oldies, Alternative, Folk and Current Chart Hits, we continue to serve the listener. It’s this enigmatic reason that the station remains the preferred choice in most Greek and Cypriot homes, offices, shops, factories, workplaces, vehicles and venues.

In conclusion, he states that “our multilingual programmes–English and Greek–reach a large and diverse audience on a global scale. It broadcasts music, interviews, announcements, community events, local news, Greek and Cypriot news in addition to church services. While catering to the lively lifestyle of one of London’s prosperous communities, the wide range of programmes are made to appeal to all age groups.”


Article written by London Greek Radio

An urgent 999 plea has been made as police are ‘very concerned’ for a UK Cypriot man who went missing from Nuneaton’s hospital.

Warwickshire Police say that Carlos Kalozoes, who went missing from the George Eliot hospital in Nuneaton on Monday night (October 16). Mr Carlos also known as Mr Kalozoes Kalozoes, Mr Zoz(o) Kalozoes Kalozoes.

The 55-year-old has not been seen since. Now officers are urging anyone who has seen him to call 999.

They also want to hear from anyone who may know where he is. Officers believe he could be in the Nuneaton, Bedworth or Coventry area.

A Warwickshire Police spokesman said: Officers are very concerned for the welfare of 55-year-old Carlos Kalozoes, who went missing from the George Eliot hospital in Nuneaton on Monday night. Officers believe he could be in the Nuneaton, Bedworth or Coventry area. “Please call 999 if you see him, or 101 if you know of his whereabouts.”

The last confirmed sighting of Mr Carlos was on Monday night in the Bedworth area at 11pm. A family statement said: The Police have advised that our beloved son, brother and dad was dropped off by Taxi at the beginning of “The Willows” in Bedworth, at approximately 11:00pm on Monday 16th October 2023. At present, there have not been any further sightings of him.

We desperately urge all walkers, hikers, dog walkers, cyclists, pedestrians, motorists and the people of Bedworth to remain extremely vigilant and to call 999 immediately if they see him, or to call Warwickshire Police on 111, should they have any relevant information, or to report any sightings after the aforementioned time.

A distraught family has issued a heartfelt plea for help to find a missing dad.

“There is still no update on the whereabouts on my dad.” A statement from his daughter Despina Kalozoes said, furthermore, she added.

I urge any of you to reach out to Warwickshire police with ANY information, or to myself or partner.

My dad is an extremely high-risk individual suffering from mental and physical problems, which include poorly controlled T1 diabetes, autism, and severe mental health and we are all worried sick.

Please share any news with anyone who has links to Nuneaton, Bedworth or Coventry. We just want him home safe.”

Please call 999 if you see him, or 101 if you know of his whereabouts.

#missingperson #publicappeal #bedworth #nuneaton #coventry #coventrycitycentre #nuneatonandbedworth #birmingham #birminghamcity #westmidlands #EastMidlands #midlands #PleaseShareThisPost #PleaseShare #publichelp


Article written by London Greek Radio

LGR first joined the airwaves as a pirate in October 1983, it became licensed in November 1989 and in May 1994 LGR’s license was renewed and extended to broadcast 24 hours a day seven days a week to the greater area of the capital from its North London studios.

Akis Eracleous and Chris Harmanda launched LGR on 8th October 1983, the first Greek pirate radio station in London. The first-ever British station to target ethnic minorities with its pioneering service to the culturally diverse Greek and Cypriot communities.

Chris Harmanda entered broadcasting to give the London Cypriot community a voice, which he and Mr Eracleous indisputably achieved. 

This month, LGR celebrates its 40th unofficial birthday. Now it is a legal service and the first 24-hour independent Greek radio station to hold the FM frequency license in London. 

Akis, who DJ’d under the name ‘George Power’, was a co-founder of Kiss FM later. In 1983, he and Mr Harmanda decided to launch LGR broadcasting from Finsbury Park to North London with a Greek music format. Programmes initially came from the studio above the Quality Fish Bar in Finsbury Park, owned by the Harmanda family, and the offices in Akis’ house in N4 Grenville Road. Eventually the station spread its wings across the city, with help from friend and engineer Pyers Easton. They moved transmissions to above a Cypriot delicatessen in Muswell Hill, where LGR’s tall aerial mast took it’s programmes to the whole of the North London area. Even in the early days of its arrival on the airwaves, LGR gathered a dedicated following very quickly.

However, sadly in 2018 we lost both men, leaving behind their incredible legacies. The perseverance and bravery of the men who scaled rooftops of sites, ensuring the next morning we all awoke to LGR. At the Haringey office, there was an iconic image that proudly hung of its founders and DJ Kokis putting up the FM aerial for the pirate station on a rooftopThe staff and volunteers endured great adversity and went to great lengths during the 1980’s to keep London Greek Radio on the air.

Akis Eracleous hosted the very first show of the unlicensed station. He and George Gregoriou, known by his nickname Kokis and Aliki Michael, graced the airwaves. Kokis, LGR’s longest-serving DJ recounted: “I was collecting Greek records because I was learning the bouzouki. I’d go up the Greek Lanes and buy 45s.”

When the station began, LGR called rag trade factories with big Cypriot workforces. “We said:Put it on you’ll hear Greek music to work by“, says Kokis. “Factory to factory, the station became known by word of mouth.”

LGR quickly soared in listening numbers and was not long after was followed by a flood of competitors i.e. GCR, Foni ton Apodimon, Foni tis Parikias, Londino ’88 and others. Despite its rivals, LGR’s reputation as the original Greek-Cypriot broadcaster garnered the kind of loyalty which out-performed its rivals. By 1987 85% of Cypriots were tuning into the unlicensed station every week.

“Growing up in North London in the 80s & 90s, the whole family was listening“. Ask a Greek or Cypriot and this is what they will tell you. LGR’s real timeless traits, which helped trigger a sense of nostalgia and a connection to their culture. This is where LGR plays to its strengths and is the reason why London-born Greeks and Cypriots come back to it. This is the modern legacy of London Greek Radio. 

LGR presenter Tony Neophytou mentions that “the Greek speaking community have a penchant for radio because of the strength of their attachment to back home. Whether they come from Cyprus, Greece or the Diaspora, anything that recreates a sense of their roots stirs them emotionally. That’s partly due to the music of course, with its lyric content, but it’s also about the culturally relevant topics we talk about.”

In the mid-1980s, tens of thousands of people signed a petition demonstrating the need for LGR to have a real presence within the community. The signatures were handed to the relevant authorities which subsequently contributed to the station being licensed by the radio authorities.

The pirate LGR left the air at the end of 1988 having decided to apply for one of the new incremental radio licenses. They decided to work together with Afro-Carribean station WNK to share a frequency, winning the North London license with a 12-hour daily allowance. LGR returned to the air legally as London’s first Greek community radio station in November 1989.

The book, ‘London’s Pirate Pioneers‘ (2015) by Stephen Hebditch tells the story of the capital’s pirate radio stations and the people who helped change the British broadcasting system.

He writes about LGR’s undeniable legacy in the eighties and the intense pressures it faced to shut down. As quoted:

“The biggest action ever taken by the authorities against LGR came in 1988 when the police raided LGR’s offices, yet again, only this time they confiscated all paperwork related to the station. In a case at Highgate Magistrates Court in July, companies and staff associated with London Greek Radio were fined £13,900 plus £10,550 in costs and expenses.”  

Thousands of listeners to LGR had come out in support of the beleaguered illegal pirate station, at a Camden event. “We were faced with closure, so we held a LGR night at the Electric Ballroom in Camden Town,” says George (‘Kokis’). “It sold out twice over and we did it again the following week for those who had missed out.”

LGR even stirred some Parliament airtime, responding to a question by a certain Jeremy Corbyn, Labour MP, that asked the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster Mr Atkins how many times his Department has confiscated equipment held by LGR.   

My department’s radio investigation service has seized equipment being illegally used by London Greek Radio on 151 occasions. The equipment when seized is held in a secure store and disposed of in accordance with section 83 of the Telecommunications Act 1984. (Hansard archive, 10th January 1989). 

However, London Greek Radio became one of Britain’s first-ever licensed ethnic radio stations upon being awarded its license.

On November 13th, 1989, LGR opened its doors as a fully legal station, with offices and a studio located on Vale Road, Haringey. In 2003, LGR purchased a freehold in Finchley and moved to its current studios in LGR House.

One of London’s first-ever licensed ethnic radio stations began official broadcasting on 13th November 1989 upon being awarded its license, breaking ground in changing the landscape of UK radio.

John Kyriakides, Chairman of London Greek Radio, described the twists and turns in the station’s turbulent history.

“It was a difficult and protracted journey. George Eracleous and Chris Harmanda, two young men who intended to launch a Greek-language pirate radio station in the early 1980s, are credited with founding the station. Eventually, the station became a target for the authorities, who prosecuted the founders and repeatedly threatened to arrest them. Though we had to share the frequency with an Afro-Caribbean channel, Eracleous and Harmanda never gave up, and with the help of the Greek and Cypriot communities, a few directors, and myself, the radio station was given a licence at the end of the decade.

“We were only permitted to broadcast for twelve hours at first, however after five years, the Afro-Caribbean station disbanded, and London Greek Radio was then granted a 24-hour radio licence and became an independent radio station.”

LGR 103.3 FM, celebrates 34 years of broadcasting as a radio station on 13th November 1989, becoming the UK’s longest-serving ethnic station to hold an FM license.

Over the years, London Greek Radio has become steadfast to a wide range of listeners; from maturing-settlers-to-the-UK to the coming-of-age London Greek-speakers – connecting listeners to their roots through a carefully balanced programming of music, speech, entertainment and news.

It serves advertising for many Greek and Cypriot run businesses in and around North London. LGR has recently increased its English language airtime encouraging more Greek-speaking young people to listen in, particularly during the daytime, drive time and evenings as part of the schedule. LGR is also recruiting younger presenters, who combine Greek music with discussions on everything from cultural identities to chart trends. 

Over the years, LGR 103.3 FM has been known for its diverse musical offerings, covering a wide range of genres, including classic and modern laika, pop-laika, entehno, elafrolaiko, and many more. It also features a mix of music news, celebrity interviews, community chest shows and cultural content designed to appeal to its demographic.

The station is an integrated part of the communities’ social lives, including the organised Greekology events. Mr Eracleous suggested launching LGR nights at a local club, which helped to boost the credibility and impact of the station. In 2012, its debut at the Marquee Club with most notably, Cypriot Eurovision star Ivi Adamou, was sold-out with over 500 people in attendance. LGR Club Nights are currently the station’s biggest event, with more than a few dates in London taking place each year.

LGR played a huge part in radio history, by giving Greek and Cypriot musicians the chance to discover a space for themselves in the music scene. Today it is the go-to station for the exploration of up-and-coming artists and homegrown talent and recently launched its own LGR Productions.

LGR has supported charities including Radiomarathon, London Autism Group Charity, UK Thalassaemia Society and Alkionides UK Charity. The Leukaemia Cancer Society even gives the credit to LGR in inspiring the creation of the cancer charity. The charity’s website acknowledges this fact.

“In 1994 London Greek Radio (LGR) put out a mother’s appeal for her son. Flushed with success the group decided to carry on recruiting new donors, raising awareness of blood cancers, and supporting patients with the disease. Within a year of hearing the appeal on London Greek Radio, the group had formed a committee and registered the charity.”

The LGR brand is still alive and well today. Today, in addition to serving communities on 103.3FM, LGR has been taken into 21st-century broadcasting by joining the Digital Radio platform.

LGR can now be heard in two major cities on DAB+ (digital radio), namely London and Birmingham.

Furthermore, listeners extend worldwide at lgr.co.uk and the station has a free app for mobile devices which listeners can download from the App or Play stores embracing the ‘on-the-move’ audience.

The audience base of LGR, which includes listeners from the Italian, Spanish, Arab, Jewish, Armenian, Bulgarian, and Turkish Cypriot communities, is well-established and diverse.

LGR’s Managing Director, Tony Jay, said, “More listeners are discovering the ever-growing London Greek Radio family every day, not only Greek-speaking listeners but English, Jewish, Albanian, Arab, Bulgarian, Turkish, Russian and many more that frequently tune in.

He added, “LGR is undergoing a revamp with fresh ideas to attract an even wider audience. Exciting times ahead ‘onwards and upwards’.”

LGR’s Chairman John Kyriakides, added, “With LGR’s edgier playlists of the biggest Greek and Cypriot tunes, Modern Laika, Greek Pop, Entehna, Golden-Oldies, Alternative, Folk and Current Chart Hits, we continue to serve the listener. It’s this enigmatic reason that the station remains the preferred choice in most Greek and Cypriot homes, offices, shops, factories, workplaces, vehicles and venues.

In conclusion, he states that “our multilingual programmes–English and Greek–reach a large and diverse audience on a global scale. It broadcasts music, interviews, announcements, community events, local news, Greek and Cypriot news in addition to church services. While catering to the lively lifestyle of one of London’s prosperous communities, the wide range of programmes are made to appeal to all age groups.”

October 2023


Article written by London Greek Radio

It is with a heavy heart that LGR announces the tremendous loss and passing of our long-time friend and colleague, Vassoula Vronti Orchard.

She passed away peacefully on Sunday 7th May 2023 after a courageous battle with Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer. She was 68.

Vassoula was a long-serving LGR employee, since it was first founded over thirty-five years ago. She has been serving the Greek Cypriot community, through her dedication to her work at LGR ever since.

Vassoula was born in Trikomo in 1954, and attended the American Academy after moving to Larnaca before arriving in the West end of London and embracing the bright lights of City Life, whilst always honouring her heritage and traditional values.

Vassoula was one in a million. A vibrant, warm, kind and thoughtful soul who was always on hand to help her colleagues, friends and loved ones, to the best of her ability. She was a consummate professional, an asset to the community and was simply irreplaceable.

Her generosity knew no bounds and there will be a huge void in the hearts and lives of everyone who had the pleasure of knowing her, working with her and loving her.

Vassoula is survived by her husband Clive, her two daughters Maria and Alexia, grandsons Tate and Miles who she absolutely adored and doted on, and son-in-law Chris, sister Demetra and brother-in-law Costakis, brother Panicos and sister-in-law Yioulla, her nieces and nephews and their families, her grandchildren, extended family and friends.

The funeral will take place on Wednesday 24th May at 11.00am at St. Panteleimon Church, 660 Kenton Road, Harrow, HA3 9QN, followed by a burial at Pinner New Cemetary, 660 Pinner Road, Pinner, HA5 5RH at 1pm.

The wake will be held at St. Panteleimon Church Hall after the funeral.

Flowers are welcome and can be sent to Demetriou & English, 131-133 Myddleton Road, London N22 8NG. There will also be an option for those wishing to donate to The Royal Marsden Cancer Charity in Vassoula’s memory via a Web link / Charity box on the day.

There will also be a memorial book at the hall for people to share their thoughts and memories, if they wish to, in remembrance of a beautiful woman whose light will shine on in the hearts of all who were lucky enough to know her.

Everyone at LGR extend their condolences to the family, and we thank her for her services to our community and to London Greek Radio.

Memory eternal, Vassoula. You will be missed.


Article written by London Greek Radio

London Cypriot Cancer Campaigner Dies Aged 32

Jo Georgiou, a young London Cypriot has died at the age of 32.

Jo passed away on 12th February after launching a public campaign against cancer and devoted her energy to raising awareness of her rare cancer diagnosis, fighting for changes to how patients are helped in terms of receiving the appropriate treatment.

Jo was diagnosed with Synovial Sarcoma, a rare and aggressive cancer in August 2021. After a year and a half of chemotherapy, surgery and other treatments, she sadly succumbed to the disease.

Synovial Sarcoma is a cancer that can come from different types of soft tissue such as muscle or ligaments. It is often found in the arm, leg or foot, and near joints such as the wrist or ankle. Only about 1 to 3 individuals in a million people are diagnosed with this disease each year. It can occur at any age, but it is more common among teenagers and young adults. The exact cause isn’t clear.

Speaking to London Greek Radio in 2021, Jo underlined the ethos of her campaigning work as absolutely vital in raising public awareness, because it was sometimes perceived as taboo, especially for young people.

Jo said that her aims were: “For synovial sarcoma to be spoken about and made aware of especially as so many people go undetected for years – and it’s very common in young people. For cancer to not be taboo… And for people knowing that nothing will prepare you for chemotherapy and I wish there was a help or guide, where people sit 1 to 1, relaying what is going to happen. What to be prepared for. And what benefits they’re entitled to. There are benefits cancer patients are entitled to that aren’t offered unless requested.”

Jo Georgiou shared her story with LGR about how her Instagram account would be helping people in similar circumstances, and to offer some reassurance.

She said, “I started an Instagram journey of my life since my diagnosis, and it is amazing that people contact me to inform me I’m helping them. It means so much to me. I’m helping people who have loved ones going through it, people just starting chemo, and people in remission. People who’ve got other health issues to , even mental health. It’s incredible what sort of platform it’s become. My Instagram following isn’t big by all means, but it feels like a community is forming on there. In my time, if I do anything, id love to form a handbook. A real handbook for patients about to start chemo who’ve just been diagnosed. From one real person who’s been through it, hand over everything to a newbie… the challenges they’ll face could be helped if I can just make them aware and prepare them for what’s going to happen.”

Jo grew up in Larnaca, Cyprus and moved to London in 2004. She attended East Barnet School where she achieved her GCSEs and A-levels. After leaving school, Jo worked her way up from a Retail Sales Assistant to an Area Manager.

She passed away at the North London Hospice surrounded by her loved ones. She leaves behind her mother, sister, extended family and friends. Her funeral service was held at Green Acres in Epping Forest on 27th February.

LGR extend their condolences to her family and friends and thank Jo for being a passionate, tireless campaigner and inspiration to others with her bravery and spirit.


Article written by London Greek Radio

Everyone at LGR was deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Takis Fellas on Saturday 18th February 2023. He was 74.

He was one of the architects of HellasSat. A former director at London Greek Radio (LGR), and the Founder, and Managing Director of Hellenic TV, a digital channel broadcasting from studios in London.

He leaves behind his mother Paraskevou, sons Nikos and Thomas, and daughter Evi. And siblings Mary, Elenitsa, Androulla, Myroulla, Panagiotis and Giorgos.

A Greek Cypriot from Pano Zodeia, Astromeritis – in the occupied north of the island – came to London at a young age and attended Wood Green School. He studied at Aston University Birmingham, Surrey University and Manchester University. He obtained the qualifications BSc in Physics, MSc in Nuclear reactor technology and a Phd in Physics.

Speaking to Cyprus Mail, before his death, Mr Fellas recollected: “It was a momentous moment in the history of the Greek and Cypriot communities in the UK. As all the founding members huddled together in a small studio, the first Greek language television programme aired for three hours to thirteen homes in the Camden area, establishing Hellenic TV (HTV) as the first fully operating Greek language television channel outside of Greece and Cyprus.

“Since that historic day in 1990, HTV has evolved into a thriving digital platform…”

Chris Fellas was a firm believer in preserving and promoting the Cypriot and Greek cultural heritage in the UK and act as a bridge between the British Cypriot diaspora and Cyprus.

“I never imagined I would be making history when I first went out to accomplish my work. I enjoyed what I was doing, and I feel it is my duty to provide a platform that inspires people, especially the younger generation, to become ambassadors of Greece and Cyprus while growing up in the United Kingdom.”

The Church service will be held this morning at St Demetrius Greek Orthodox Church in North London, Edmonton. His body will be flown to Cyprus for the funeral and burial in the Cypriot village Astromeritis on March 16th.

Everyone at LGR extend their condolences to the family and we thank him for his services to our community.

Published: 13th March 2023


Article written by London Greek Radio

London Autism Group Charity is launching a drop-in autism community café for the Greek & Cypriot community

The London Autism Group Charity are launching a new drop-in autism community café scheme for the Greek and Greek Cypriot community of London, although all people from any background are welcome.

The community café will be at the Cypriot Community Centre in Wood Green every last Saturday of the month, at 11am-1pm. The charity is having the brief launch ceremony on 29th October at 10.45am where there will be time to meet the team, answer questions and take some photos.

The scheme is aimed at anyone with an interest or connection with autism and neurodiversity, including Autistics (of any age), parents, carers and allies. It is entirely free, with biscuits, cakes, drinks and sensory toys available, and no pre-registration required.

Regarding what the initiative is trying to achieve, Charity lead, and co-lead of this initiative, Dr Chris Papadopoulos said: “Up to now, there haven’t been any clear and regular opportunities for Greek Autistics – and the wider Greek community – to regularly come together in a safe, inclusive place so they can meet others, relax in a friendly and welcoming space, and, really importantly, feel less isolated. This is really important because autism isn’t something that is very openly discussed in the Greek community, the result of which can mean that autistic people feel  misunderstood or rejected. So an initiative like this which has a clear focus on autism in the Greek community, and helps bring people together, can help with that.”

Ellie Kolatsi, a parent of an autistic child and co-lead of the initiative, said: “I am extremely excited to be involved in such a great initiative which is important to me and my family as my son is autistic. It is an opportunity for the Greek community who are autistic or carers of autistic people to connect with each other in a meaningful way. Our aim is to create a space for conversations to happen in a non-judgemental environment and where better than in the heart of our community, the Cypriot Community Centre. We are also fortunate to be able to share information and our experiences every first Thursday evening of the month on London Greek Radio who are also kindly supporting this initiative.”

Sophia Christophi, an autistic adult and co-lead of the initiative, said: “As a Greek Cypriot autistic adult, I have not had much opportunity to talk about autism within the community… until now! I am delighted to be part of this new initiative to help Greek and Greek Cypriots understand more about autism and to promote the social inclusion and acceptance of autistic people. It’s so important for people to have accurate information about autism, and we are fortunate to have a monthly All About Autism show on LGR where we will be discussing various autism-related topics. We extend our thanks to the Cypriot Community Centre for supporting the community café, which will be a great way of bringing people together.”

Dr Chris Papadopoulos – email: chris.papadopoulos@beds.ac.uk, tel: 07719021766
London Autism Group Charity – email: contact@londonautismgroupcharity.org, website: londonautismgroupcharity.org


Article written by London Greek Radio