Today, 18th October, marks the first anniversary of the sad passing of LGR’s Founder and former Managing Director, Akis Eracleous, AKA George Power.

All the team at LGR have fond memories of Akis and all his work at London Greek Radio. We wanted to share some beloved memories of Akis, forever with a smile on his face, doing what he loved: presenting shows on London Greek Radio & managing the LGR events which he launched in 2012.

We hope that his family and friends are finding comfort in the legacy that he has left behind.

In 1983, Akis felt there was a need for a Greek radio station to give a voice to our community. No one could have imagined the success of London Greek Radio (LGR) as a pirate/unlicensed station. Thanks to his devotion, determination and continuous battles to keep the station on air, LGR became the world’s first Greek Radio Station to obtain an FM licence in 1989. This was achieved after Akis sold KISS FM, as he believed that providing the community with a platform was integral.

Akis was one of the iconic presenters during the 1980’s and quickly found fame within the Greek and Cypriot communities. He continued his work when LGR was licensed in 1989, serving as a Director, Managing Director, Station Manager, Shareholder, but most notably, hosting the long-running mid-morning show, “Ligo Prin To Mesimeri” on weekdays. Akis championed the modernisation of the station to bring it into the 21st century. He was a mentor to the upcoming younger generation of presenters and helped them to establish themselves as household names within the Greek and Cypriot Communities.

Akis, also known as ‘George Power’, found fame on the British soul scene in the 1970s and 80s as a resident DJ at Crackers Nightclub on Wardour Street and The Electric Ballroom on Camden High Street. George was an essential and influential DJ on the London Club Scene. Making a name for himself at the legendary Crackers on Friday afternoons and Sunday nights, George had a massive following from the regular “soul-boys” to the trendy celebrities – even Gary Kemp (Spandau Ballet) was spotted in the club. His Roller Disco’s at the Electric Ballroom on Wednesday nights with Paul “Trouble” Anderson and his Double Disco on Friday nights with Gilles Peterson were a huge success in the mid-eighties. It cannot be understated how important George was to London’s clubs in the 70s and 80s. In 1993, he founded the “Nice ‘N’ Ripe” record label, which is renowned as one of the leaders in the birth and growth of the scene called “UK Garage”.

Today we’ve shared with you just a small section of Akis’ career and life. He was an amazing man and an inspirational leader. Words cannot begin to describe his impact on radio, on music and on his friends and family. RIP to our beloved GP.


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Stavros Flatley has come second in Britain’s Got Talent’s Champions Final.

The British-born, Greek-Cypriot, father-son dance duo was voted second on Saturday night’s “Britain’s Got Talent: The Champions Final” who were looking for the ‘ultimate champion’.

The likeable pair, Demi Demetriou and son Michalakis (nickname ‘Lagi’) excitingly engaged the studio and got the judges on their feet.  Their routine was backed by the world-famous Mikis Theodorakis, “Zorba the Greek” music.

The routine over, senior Demetriou said to the judges and audience, “You’re all Greek now!”

The two-minute routine was fired-up with Cypriot dancers to compliment the act, which included Anthony Komodikis and Kiri Pitt.

Family and friends, including wife and mum, Karen Demetriou waved Cyprus flags.  Listeners told LGR that they felt uniquely proud of seeing the Cypriot-patriotic colours at such a huge television event.

Demi Demetriou, 51, bounced onto the stage in character of the usual Riverdance music, only for Lagi, 23, to ‘cut it off’ and announce: “Let’s do this Greek style.”

He then told his dad: “Teach them to dance!”

Demi happily obliged, demanding that everybody in the studio gets up on their feet as Zorba the Greek started playing.

Stavros Flatley were Britain’s Got Talent finalists in the third series of the show, ten years ago in 2009.

Speaking after their energetic performance, judge David Walliams told them, “This is interpretive dance, it’s an interpretation of what dance is, and it was great you involved all of us actually.”

Simon Cowell agreed, with the 60-year-old telling the pair: “You just make us feel-good. In this country we just want to feel good and that is what you have just done.” Alesha Dixon echoed the sentiment, saying, “You made us smile, you made us feel good. What more can I say, I love you”.

Amanda Holden summarised the pair’s legacy with, “You are the heart of Britain’s Got Talent! You make my heart sing!”

In the end, the winners were dance duo Twist and Pulse.  Ukrainian sand-artist Kseniya Simonova came third.

From LGR’s point of view, we thank Demi and Laki for the fun. The duo have often said it’s just a “fun jokey act” but one that we think, has always managed to extract that joyful, feel-good factor.


Article written by London Greek Radio

A Just Giving page has been created in an attempt to raise £35,000 to help with the costs of bringing back a Greek-Cypriot dad to London, to receive expert care and treatment at a hospital close to his home.

The man’s children desperately want to bring dad back home to receive the appropriate amount of support and loving care, while doing what they can to ensure he fully recovers.

The daughter Maria Panayiotou has set up the Just Giving Page ‘Please Help Bring My Dad Home’ in which explains the weeks of coping with her father’s sudden ill-health, whilst on holiday in Cyprus. Maria and sister Androulla have been at their father’s side continuously which has meant being separated from family and absent from work for many weeks.

On the 11th August 2019 the father suffered a severe Intracerebral Haemorrhage to his brain and was taken to the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) at Nicosia General Hospital.

On 11th September, due to overcrowding at the General Hospital he was moved to the ICU at the American Medical Centre in Nicosia where he continued to receive treatment.

Since then 9 weeks of treatment has continued and the father has defied the odds with showing some signs of improvement.

The siblings want to better support dad, surrounded by his closest and most dearest family members at his very side. Being of course given the chance to be at home with his loved ones, Maria Panayiotou writes on the Just Giving Page: “Being away from our families in the UK has been so tough and desperately need to bring him back here with us so we can continue to support him and where he can continue to receive the treatment he requires in order to recover.”

The family need help to raise money to fly him back over to the UK so he can receive the expert care he needs.

If you are able to support the family and donate ANYTHING it would be greatly appreciated!

Just Giving page to make your donation, right here, this very link:

https://www.gofundme.com/f/1rwj9l4ltc


Article written by London Greek Radio

National Thalassaemia Day in memory of Costas Kountourou on Saturday 19th October 2019, Open Day, why not be screened for the world’s most common genetic blood disorder that you may not know you carry, you may only save of your future generations .

Don’t wait until it’s too late, find out now, in partnership with the NHS Blood and Transplant at UK Thalassaemia Society, 19 The Broadway, Southgate N14 6PH, 0208 882 0011, ukts.org

The United Kingdom Thalassaemia Society (UKTS) will be launching National Thalassaemia Day (UK) on 19th October 2019. This date has been chosen to mark the 10-year anniversary of the passing of Costas Kountourou, a prominent figure in the world of thalassaemia.

On this date, the charity will open its doors to the general public to walk in and be tested for thalassaemia and other conditions.
At the open day UKTS will:
• Offer free screening to the general public for thalassaemia and sickle cell trait.
• Offer counselling and guidance (for positive test results).
• Partner with NHSBT for “know your type” blood testing / promote the need for blood donation.
• Offer free screening for Hepatitis C and other infected diseases.

Whilst these are the main activities UKTS is concentrating on, additional events are being planned for the day. The society is extending an invitation to all interested to join them on the 19th October 2019 as this is a major awareness-raising event. Given that there are over 300,000 carriers with thalassaemia in the United Kingdom and that it is a hereditary condition, clearly there are many members of the public who could benefit from thalassemia screening.

Thalassaemia is a chronic blood disorder affecting the genes that are responsible for production of red blood cells. What this means is that patients with thalassaemia are dependent on regular blood transfusions throughout their lives. Without them, they would die in early childhood. Thalassaemia developed as an evolutionary response to malaria which is why it mainly affects those coming from regions such as Asia and South East Asia, the Mediterranean, South America, the Caribbean, Northern and Central Africa and the Middle East. Whilst it was initially prevalent in these regions, due to the migration of communities over the centuries, anyone can be at risk. In fact, 10,000 babies are born with thalassaemia every year. This is why it is so important to be screened.

In the UK, women are typically offered screening after they become pregnant despite it being available to everyone at any point in time. The blood test is usually done between 8-10 weeks. If the expectant mother has a positive result, the father of the baby is then screened. This process can sometimes, despite the best efforts by the NHS team, take the pregnancy up to 16 weeks, at which point it may be too late.

All it takes is a blood test to find out if you carry the gene! It’s better to be informed now so you can protect your unborn children, rather than be surprised later.

Please support this event in order to prevent children being born with thalassaemia.

On Saturday 19th October 2019

UK Thalassaemia Society flyer


Article written by London Greek Radio